Tag Archives: germany

34C3

I’m very excited to have two talks at CCC at the end of the month. The bulk of accepted talks can be seen and voted on at the CCC “halfnarp”.

The first talk is on the Internet in Cuba. It expands upon the recent talk I presented at IMC last month, to provide additional color on what Internet access is really like in Cuba, and what the community there is doing to create LANs and other alternatives to the official but expensive ETECSA service.

The second talk looks again at technology in Pyongyang. Since 2014, there have been a number of talks about the totally closed off tech ecosystem there, but as it ramps up we continue to only get a few glimpses into what’s going on, and it’s getting only harder as the broader tensions ramp up. My goal is to propose a path for getting more rather than less transparency into the picture, because it is a really fascinating place.

The talks should both be recorded, and might even be streamed. If you’re one of the (I hear it could be up 16,000) participants, I hope to see you in Leipzig!

The state of Internet Censorship

I’ll be presenting next week at 32C3 on the state of Internet access, transparency, and measurement. Lots of the work is done each year on measuring and learning about the state of access, but this phenomenon with growing relevance to many countries is poorly publicized. Much of this is a fear that being too public about what can be measured will make the network operators move to even more opaque techniques, since in many instances these systems are seen to thrive in structures without accountability.

Needless to say, it has been a busy year in the space, with increased funding for the measurement community and a multitude of new policy in response to ISIS and other perceived threatening uses of Internet Speech.

I’m excited to be heading back to Germany for the holidays, and hope to provide a reasonable survey of what’s out there and make the network measurement field a bit more accessible!

CCC

30c3
I spent the last four days at 30C3, the annual Chaos Communication Congress. It was great to put faces to names, and to get to interact with a bunch of people I’ve met online. It was also really interesting to compare the congress with academic conferences I’ve been to previously, and to think about which model does a better job of making connections and sharing ideas.